Thousands of protests were held on Sunday in major cities in Morocco after the tragic death of 31-year-old fishmonger of Mohsin Fikri, reports TASS.

According to local human rights activists, local officials were going to dispose of a large batch of fish, claiming that Fikri trading in violation of the rules, marketing the illegal catch. The seller rushed to rescue the goods, but landed in automatic garbage liner.

Having received injuries incompatible with life, he died on the spot. Residents of several towns in the North of the country, where many ethnic Berbers, met the incident with obvious indignation.

To find out what was the cause of death of people and could have prevented the incident, the criminal police and Prosecutor’s office started investigations.

The participants of major protests filled the streets of Moroccan cities. According to local residents, so large-scale unrest in Morocco was in 2011, when the events of the “Arab spring” in the Kingdom, held demonstrations demanding reform and improve the quality of life.

Sunday’s rally was supported by the opposition of different political color, including banned in Morocco the movement “Justice and charity”. According to the correspondent of TASS, the crowd was blamed for the death of the salesman who left the family, “in power and demonstrated the cruelty and indifference.”

King Mohammed VI instructed the Minister of internal Affairs Mohammed Hassab heading to al-Hoceima, where the incident occurred, and to Express condolences to the family of the deceased merchant. He also instructed to conduct a thorough investigation of the incident.

The Minister assured that the monarch instructed to conduct a thorough investigation to identify all those involved in the incident. He also stressed that all the perpetrators will be severely punished according to law.



A wave of demonstrations swept across Morocco because of the death dealer, who tried to protect their fisheries from the authorities 31.10.2016

Share this news

Share to Google Plus
Share to LiveJournal