A letter by Russian writer Anton Chekhov, written at the age of 23, sold for 3.6 million rubles. It is reported by RIA “Novosti” with reference to the press service of the auction house “Russian enamel”.

A letteraddressed to Gabriel Kravtsov and dated January 29, 1883, was estimated at 2,1-2,2 million rubles.

“One of the top lots of the auction was a great letter writer a friend of the family Gabriel Kravtsov. It was written a year before the publication of the first book by Chekhov, and in it the author mentions some of his aliases”, – stated in the message.

“Life is bearable, but even then alas! Working as a lackey, I go at five o’clock in the morning. Write in the logs and nothing is worse than trying to keep up to date. The money is there. Eat well, drink too dress up not bad, but… it has no extra meat! Say, I lost weight drastically,” writes Chekhov. “Work in Peter and in Moscow, was known, familiar with all… Life is almost fun,” the letter reads.

The letter was signed: A. Chekhov, the writer below mentions a few of his aliases – A. Chekhonte, M. Carpets, People without a spleen. “So I signed, working 6-7 editions. Get 8. for the line,” he says.

The interest of collectors called and the first book of Chekhov’s “Tales of Melpomene. Six short stories, published under the pseudonym of A. Chekhonte, in 1884. Edition went for 1.8 million rubles, with a starting price of 600 thousand.

Was sold at auction and a few books in his lifetime Chekhov with his autographs. The second book writer of “Motley stories,” published in 1886 under the pseudonym of A. Chekhonte autographed publisher Ivan Belousov, bought for 1.7 million rubles.

Lifetime ten-volume collected works of Chekhov, published by A. F. Marx in the years 1899-1901, and two of the five additional volumes published after his death, was sold for 3.5 million rubles, while the estimate of 1.7 million rubles.



“Working as a lackey”: letter 23-year-old Anton Chekhov was sold for 3.6 million rubles 03.10.2016

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